Oscar Omar Alonzo Aguilar Cual Bicicleta Coop Coffees

We are headed to a coffee farm named “Cual Bicicleta”, or “Which Bicycle”? I knew this wasn’t going to be a typical farm – actually nothing about Oscar Omar Alonzo Aguilar is typical! Oscar is a passionate soil advocate – his farm is an incredible living testament to the organic farmer’s mantra “Feed the soil.. let the soil feed the plant”. Take a few minutes to read Monika’s blog post chronicling her eye-opening visit to Oscar’s farm. We loved any opportunity to connect coffee and bicycling.. but didn’t expect to run across this connection in Honduras!

More than half of Chajulense members coffee fields have been lost to roya and will undergo complete renovation.

Cafe Campesino launched its first Birding and Coffee Tour of Guatemala in February 2014, visiting three regions in nine days, including Chajul (and its environs) in the Guatemalan Highlands where we source coffee. We logged more than 100 species of birds on the trip, visiting Antigua, near Guatemala City, Chajul, in the Quiche department, and […]

Richland Distilling Company is located in Richland, GA. The owners Erik and Karin Vonk and master distiller Jay McCain are helping put Richland on the map by making authentic, quality products. Garden and Gun calls Richland Rum “the smooth amber liquid that had brought new life to this town.” It is a family-owned business and makes Richland Rum exclusively.

We believe White Oak Pastures is a gem in Southwest Georgia. Primarily a livestock farm and processing facility, White Oak Pastures stands out nationally for its sustainable farming practices and commitment to land stewardship, animal husbandry, and organics. Plus, the folks who work there are just so darn innovative, creative and committed to doing the right thing for their community, the land they live on and the animals that feed them.

These seven principles recognized by the United Nations help guide business practices at Cooperative Coffees and farmer’s coops around the world. Viva le co-op!

Roya or coffee “rust” is an orange fungus that grows on the leaves of coffee plants causing them to wither and fall off.  We witnessed the effects in Guatemala.

Finding affordable financing is one of the greatest challenges facing small-scale coffee farmers. Like any business, farmer co-ops need access to capital until money starts coming in from their sales. Farmers need to make improvements to their land, investments in their crops and purchases that keep their families fed and children healthy.

In January of 2013, I had the opportunity to go with Cafe Campesino on a cooperative tour of Guatemala. Sure, we all know Cafe Campesino makes great coffee and that this great coffee is traded in a way the best serves the farmers who nurture and grow the beans, but to actually go out and meet the people in this supply chain made a tremendous difference in how I view an already superior product and business model. Through this trip, I was informed and reminded of this simple fact: what you purchase has direct consequences on others.

Our group on their first day in Guatemala

Our group including Mike Weaver of Sweetwater Organic Coffee and Dave Campbell of Cafe Campesino on their first day visiting Manos Campesinas in Guatemala.

Julia Salinas of LA FEM harvests ripe coffee cherries in Nicaragua. Photo by Julia Baumgartner for Cafe Campesino. September 2012

La Fundacion Entre Mujeres is a well-organized, all-woman NGO in northern Nicaragua committed to selling quality, Fair Trade coffee while empowering rural women

It preserves ecologically diverse woodlands, provides habitat for hummingbirds, and keeps chemicals out of coffee fields away from farmers and local residents.